Niagara, Frederic Church, 1857

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Spring Quarter 2017:

Class began on 3 April.  Please be sure that you have resolved any logistical issues with administration and records and that you have or will receive your books shortly. Questions? You may e-mail me or ring me at 253.335.8050.

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More Info:

Access the quick links below to complementary websites for this class.

Links:

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arrow "A History of the World in 100 Objects"
arrow Bellevue College Library
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 Last Updated
 25 April 2017

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ill titleSyllabus

Class Web Site

http://www.chiemima.com/Hist101/

Contact Information

My e-mail address is: Chiemi.Ma@bellevuecollege.edu. Please feel free to e-mail frequently. I will certainly do my best to answer you as soon as possible and almost always on the same day or within twenty-four hours. My telephone number is: 253.335.8050 (mobile). Please feel free to ring at anytime. Leave a message and I will return your call at my earliest convenience. Office Hours: Very flexible. Please contact by e-mail or telephone to make arrangements

Course Outcomes

This course is a survey of the political, social, and cultural history of the Ancient World. Upon completion of the course, students will have learned to analyze primary source documents; interrogate historical representations of gender, class, and society; and explain key concepts, events, and people in World History. This course may count as a social science or humanities credit, but not both, at Bellevue College.

How Outcomes Will Be Met

Course outcomes will be met through the following assessments: 10 group papers, five (5) tests, a Chicago citation exercise in two parts, and a final research paper that acts as a final exam.

Books and Materials Required

In order to keep costs of books and materials to a minimum for my students, I have eschewed traditional textbooks and have selected the following as germane to this class. These are easily obtainable through Amazon or other online book retailers as well as through local booksellers using the ISBNs provided. The most expensive versions of the required textbooks in total should not exceed $60 including sales tax. Buying used paperback or Kindle versions will lower the costs considerably. If you have a Kindle device or app, I highly recommend the Kindle versions, if available.

Required Texts:

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind | Yuval Noah Harari

  • Kindle: $16.99 ASIN: B00ICN066A
  • Hardcover: $21.60
    • ISBN-10: 0062316095
    • ISBN-13: 978-0062316097
  • Paperback 2014 ed. (Third-party sellers only) from $6.84
    • ISBN-10: 0062316117
    • ISBN-13: 978-0062316110

Herodotus and Sima Qian: The First Great Historians of Greece and China: A Brief History with Documents (Bedford Cultural Editions Series) | Thomas Martin

  • Paperback format available only: $5.61-$19.12
    • ISBN-13: 978-0312416492
    • ISBN-10: 0312416490

Ibn Fadlan and the Land of Darkness: Arab Travellers in the Far North (Penguin Classics) | Ibn Fadlan

  • Kindle format: $9.99 ASIN: B008DM2MXU
  • Paperback format: $7.38-$11.63 (Prime)
    • ISBN-10: 0140455078
    • ISBN-13: 978-0140455076

PLEASE NOTE: IF YOU NEED COURSE ADAPTATIONS AND ACCOMMODATIONS BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY, PLEASE MAKE SURE THAT YOU PROVIDE ME WITH FULL DOCUMENTATION NO LATER THAN THE 10TH DAY OF CLASS.

Online Classroom Learning Atmosphere

Instructor's Expectation: This class is based on collaborative work amongst students in small groups. This includes regular and consistent communications between students, their classmates, and the instructor. You are expected to respond to e-mails and assignments. Student expectations of the instructor is that she will respond to communication no later than 24 hours. The hours between 8:00 p.m. and 8:00 a.m. Pacific Time and weekends are excepted.

Affirmation of Inclusion: Bellevue College is committed to maintaining an environment in which every member of the campus community feels welcome to participate in the life of the college, free from harassment and discrimination. We value our different backgrounds at Bellevue College, and students, faculty, staff members, and administrators are to treat one another with dignity and respect.

Religious Holidays: Students who expect to miss classes, examinations, or any other assignments as a consequence of their religious observance should be provided with a reasonable alternative opportunity to complete such academic responsibilities. It is the obligation of students to provide faculty with reasonable notice of the dates of religious holidays on which they will be absent, preferably at the beginning of the term. Students who are absent on days of examinations or class assignments should be offered an opportunity to make up the work without penalty (if they have previously arranged to be absent), unless it can be demonstrated that a makeup opportunity would constitute an unreasonable burden on a member of the faculty. Should disagreement arise over what constitutes an unreasonable burden or any element of this policy, parties involved should consult the department chair, or Dean.

College Anti-Discrimination Statement: Bellevue College does not discriminate on the basis of race or ethnicity; color; creed; national origin; sex; marital status; sexual orientation; age; religion; genetic information; the presence of any sensory, mental, or physical disability; gender identity or veteran status in educational programs and activities which it operates.

Confidentiality and Mandatory Reporting: As an instructor, one of my responsibilities is to help create a safe learning environment on our campus. It is my goal that you feel able to share information related to your life experiences in classroom discussions, in your written work, and in our one-on-one meetings. I will seek to keep information you share private to the greatest extent possible. However, I am required to share with the Title IX Coordinator any and all information regarding sexual assault and other forms of sexual misconduct (e.g. dating violence, domestic violence, stalking) that may have occurred on campus or that impacts someone on campus. Students may speak to someone confidentially by contacting the BC Counseling Center at (425) 564-2212. The Title IX Office can be contacted at 425-564-2441 and more information can be found at www.bellevuecollege.edu/titleix/.

For further information and contacts, please consult College Anti-Discrimination Statements.

Student Code of Conduct and Academic Integrity

Any act of academic dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism (using the ideas or words of another as one’s own without crediting the source), and fabrication and inappropriate/disruptive classroom behavior are violations of the Student Code of Conduct at Bellevue College. Specific student rights, responsibilities, and appeal procedures are listed in the Student Code of Conduct at: Student Code.

Plagiarism: Information about Bellevue College's copyright guidelines can be found at: College Copyright Policy. This link provides a good, short summary of how to avoid plagiarism: Avoiding Plagiarism

This 22-minute video also provides a good overview of how to avoid trouble when using sources: From the college home page select SERVICES, then LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER, then DATABASES, then FILMS ON DEMAND. At their site, search by title for PLAGIARISM 2.0: ETHICS IN THE DIGITAL AGE.

Important Bellevue College Links

Bellevue College E-mail and Access to MyBC All students registered for classes at Bellevue College are entitled to a network and e-mail account. Your student network account can be used to access your student e-mail, log in to computers in labs and classrooms, connect to the BC wireless network and log in to MyBC. To create your account, go to: Create Email .

BC offers a wide variety of computer and learning labs to enhance learning and student success. Find current campus locations for all student labs by visiting the Technology Help Desk

Disability Resource Center (DRC): The Disability Resource Center serves students with a wide array of learning challenges and disabilities. If you are a student who has a disability or learning challenge for which you have documentation or have seen someone for treatment and if you feel you may need accommodations in order to be successful in college, please contact us as soon as possible.

If you are a person who requires assistance in case of an emergency situation, such as a fire, earthquake, etc, please meet with your individual instructors to develop a safety plan within the first week of the quarter.

If you are a student with a documented autism spectrum disorder, there is an additional access program available to you. Contact Autism Spectrum Navigators. Email and phone number is on the web page. ASN is located in the Library Media Center in D125.

The DRC office is located in B132 or you can call our reception desk at 425.564.2498. Deaf students can reach us by Skype: the address is DRCatBC (NOTE: There is no @ sign...it is actually DRCatBC). Please visit our website at Disability Resource Center for application information into our program and other helpful links.

Accessibility: The online elements of this course are designed to be welcoming to, accessible to, and usable by everyone, including students who are English-language learners, have a variety of learning styles, have disabilities, or are new to online learning. Be sure to let me know immediately if you encounter a required element or resource in the course that is not accessible to you. Also, let me know of changes I can make to the course so that it is more welcoming to, accessible to, or usable by students who take this course in the future.

Public Safety (In the event you are on campus):

Public Safety and Emergencies: Public Safety is located in the K building and can be reached at 425-564-2400 (easy to remember because it’s the only office on campus open 24 hours a day—2400). Among other things, Public Safety serves as our Parking Permits, Lost and Found, and Emergency Notification center. Please ensure you are signed up to receive alerts through our campus alerting system by registering at RAVE Alert Registration

If you work late and are uneasy about going to your car, Public Safety will escort you to your vehicle. To coordinate this, please phone ahead and let Public Safety know when and where you will need an escort.

Please familiarize yourself with the emergency postings by the door of every classroom and know where to go in the event of an evacuation. Your instructor will be asked if anyone might still be in the building, so check in before you do anything else. Emergency responders will search for anyone unaccounted for. If a major emergency occurs, please follow these three rules:

Please do not hesitate to call Public Safety if you have safety questions or concerns at any time. You may also visit the Public Safety web page for answers to your questions.

Final Exam: Final Exam Schedule: Your final exam will be your final (individual) paper, due 6 December 2016. This paper must demonstrate all you have learnt duing the term regarding basic historical research skills, Chicago citation, logical and cogent arguments, correct grammar, and writing mechanics. You may choose the topic of your paper, but the topic must be confined within the historical timeline of this class. Specific guide and rubric will be available in Canvas.

Academic Calendar

The Bellevue College Academic Calendar is separated into two calendars. They provide information about holidays, closures and important enrollment dates such as the finals schedule.

Scheduled Course Calendar

Please click on the link above to access the online calendar. This is a Google calendar that makes updating convenient for me.

Grading Scheme: Please click here to access assignment values.

Course Requirements:
Each student is required to complete the reading assignments in a timely manner. No one has the luxury of procrastination. You will have ten weekly group papers, one citation exercise, five tests (includes the mid-term), and one final paper.

Course Suggestions:
Supplemental materials have been made available to the class. Rather than view these as cumbersome, it will be more effective to view these readings and links as very helpful tools.

Submitting Assignments:
The writing assignments are listed within the calendar on the Class Schedule page well as within the Canvas environment within the "Assignments" tab. Submission of completed assignments through Canvas is convenient because it provides a storage space for your documents and my feedback (if any). You may, however, e-mail the written assignments directly to me, IF you are having problems with Canvas or have questions regarding how to complete an assignment until you understand how to submit through the assignment page in Angel. Please attach the assignments as Word.doc files. Mac Users:  Please save your documents as .doc or .docx.  Do not save as .pages or .pdf file extensions.

Tests:
There will be four tests each worth 50 points and one midterm worth 100 points (to total 300 points). There are no plans to include a multiple-choice format - in other words, you are expected to fully grasp the course content.

Writing Assignments:
The weekly group writing assignments serve two basic purposes. The first purpose is to learn the rudiments of research skills and the mechanics of documentation the the citation exercises given in two parts. The second purpose is not only to apply those skills in a paper, but to know how to develop a thesis, support the thesis with documentation, and defend one's conclusions using correct grammar, mechanics, and word usage. The research paper is worth 200 points.

More suggestions:

I.   Learn Actively - Learning is a personal, interactive process that results in greater expertise and a more comprehensive understanding of the world.

II.   Think Critically, Creatively and Reflectively - Reason and imagination are fundamental to problem solving and critical examination of ideas.

III.   Communicate with Clarity and Originality - The ability to exchange ideas and information is essential to personal growth, productive work, and societal vitality.

IV.   Interact in Diverse and Complex Environments - Successful negotiation through our increasingly complex, interdependent and global society requires knowledge and awareness of self and others, as well as enhanced interaction skills.

 

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